Written by The Editors of DuJour

A year after the Whitney Museum decamped from its historic Brutalist Marcel Breuer home on Madison Avenue, there’s a new tenant moving in: the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Opening on March 18, the Met Breuer will offer space to explore the museum’s collection from the 20th and 21st centuries. First up is the survey Unfinished: Thoughts Left Visible, which comprises 197 works dating from the Renaissance to the present by artists including Louise Bourgeois, Jackson Pollock, Titian, Rembrandtand Turner. 

 

945 Madison Avenue; metmuseum.org

  Edvard Munch, “Madonna”, 1895–1902

Edvard Munch, “Madonna”, 1895–1902

The Neue Galerie’s latest exhibition, Munch and Expressionism, examines the impact that Norwegian artist Edvard Munch and his dark 1895 masterwork “The Scream” had on Austrian and German contemporaries like Max Beckmann and Egon Schiele, and vice versa. The show, curated by Expressionist scholar Jill Lloyd, will showcase 35 paintings and 50 works on paper from both public and private collections worldwide, some of which have never been seen in the United States. Through June 13. 

1048 Fifth Avenue; neuegalerie.org

  A piece from “Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony”

A piece from “Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony”

This spring, the Noguchi Museum in Long Island City plays host to Tom Sachs: Tea Ceremony, the institution’s first exhibition devoted to a single artist who isn’t Isamu Noguchi. Sachs’ interactive, multipart installation—composed of a tea house within a garden studded with a selection of Noguchi’s basalt sculptures—includes all of the elements necessary forchanoyu, the traditional Japanese tea ceremony. “With his kid-in-the-candy-shop ethos, coupled with a commitment to process and craft, Tom promises to transform the experience of the museum this spring,” says director Jenny Dixon. Through July 24.

9-01 33rd Road; noguchi.org

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